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In the heat of career fair season, we understand that many of you are faced with the decision to either return to the company you worked for this summer or pursue a new opportunity. Today, as part 1 of our 2 part saga, we’re hoping to teach you about some of the benefits of following a second-year internship at the same company.

Benefits of Returning . . .

  1. Sense of Role-ownership: One great aspect of returning to the same company you’ve worked at before is the relationships you’ve already built. Utilizing those connections, especially with hiring managers or internal recruiters, may allow you to gain some freedom in choosing which role you pursue in your second year. Whether this means transitioning to another team, project, or an entirely new subset of a company, taking advantage of internal resources will prove highly valuable.
  2. New Mentors: Another way to make use of your experience is by beginning to envision the type of mentor, or mentors you can pursue upon your return. Building additional connections to expand your internal, and potentially external, network is a great way to continue to gauge your own career interests and desires.
  3. Even Larger Network: While you have likely already built a sturdy network within the company you worked for, returning will allow you to build an even larger number of connections by surrounding yourself with employees of all different backgrounds, job functions, and teams. While this is especially useful for interns or graduates returning to larger companies which offer a greater and larger variety of employees, deepening connections will always prove useful. You never know if the connection you built may find themselves in a leadership role and in need of a new employee on their team. Better yet, mentors often transition into higher roles where they may then recommend you to take their previous spot!
  4. Opportunity to Relocate: If you work for an organization which houses several locations across the United States, returning to your previous position as an intern may allow you to internally “build your roots” within the company and, later on, have a greater say in where you are placed permanently. This is a huge component of your future and definitely important to continue to keep in mind! If you are happy where you live, you are much more likely to enjoy what you do!

Now that you’ve seen some leading factors in the benefits of returning to a company for a second-year internship, we’ll introduce you to a few reasons that may lead you to decide to explore elsewhere. While we don’t have the right answer for you, we’re hoping that you can lead feeling educated, well-versed, and with multiple different perspectives!

Missed our last blog? Check out what to look for before accepting a position here!

Searching for a new position? Check out our open jobs!

As I mentioned in our most recent article (if you missed it… go check it out from Monday!), I worked for an extremely large corporate office this summer. In reflecting on my experience, I recognized that there truly is a large difference between working for a large company versus a smaller one. While I am not here to tell you which is better (because that is truly up to your own personality type and preferences) I am excited to share and offer a few perspectives to assist you in your own future job search.

Top 4 Differences…

  1. Daily Interactions: If you work for a small company, it is almost guaranteed that you will be able to build strong, deep-rooted connections with each of the employees that you interact with each day and in every project. You’ll come to quickly understand “who does what” and where to go to reach out for help in any instance. However, working for a large company means that you will be working alongside many people who specialize in an array of different roles. For that reason, you will likely find yourself reaching out to many different people for each different need. Doing so will help you to immerse yourself in different types of positions and establish a collective understanding of how your company operates and achieves success.
  2. Lateral Movements: Are you ready to settle down in a position and dig your roots deep? If so, I would encourage you to check out a smaller organization. Doing so will help you to solidify your role and gain deep, intellectual knowledge in your newfound specialty. However, if you are someone who is still unsure of what you want to do in the end game (which is also totally okay – and is more like me!), then you may want to think about working for a larger corporation that will provide you with the ability to make lateral movements often, sometimes even yearly. Lateral movement will help you to explore new opportunities without having to conduct a whole new job search.
  3. Relationship Building: As it relates to daily interactions, communicating to a smaller group of people will allow you to cultivate meaningful relationships, potentially helping you to see a “home” in your role for many years to come. On the other hand, as working for a large organization will require many hands on deck across several teams, meeting many people will assist you in creating a larger network and building various connections that you never know when you may need!
  4. Mentorship Opportunities: If you work in an office that requires people to work in all types of roles in order to continue to operate (ie: Google, Apple, Sephora, etc.), your mentorship opportunities will range across several different “sub-industries” of business. However, if you are someone who is confident that you want to stay in your position and become a specialist, working for a small company may help you to find that person to act as a mention and vision of who you hope to be farther on in your career. In my personal experience, not knowing exactly what I want to do, I enjoyed finding a mentor in a Marketing role while I was housed in Risk, as it helped me envision a future outside of the office I was currently a team member within.

 

Hopefully, this helped you to visualize yourself in a bunch of different offices! So… which was your favorite? Keep trying to weigh your values and desires as you begin your full-time job or internship search in these upcoming months.

Stay tuned for our upcoming article on “What to Look Out For” when you’re evaluating your position! Missed our article on Monday? Check it out here!

Looking for a new position? Check out our open jobs!

Hello everyone – I am so excited to announce that I will be returning to Esquire Recruiting as their Social Media and Marketing Intern (and also blog-creator) for the fall semester! For those of you who may not know me, my name is Hannah McDermott and I am an incoming junior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I am majoring in Business, specifically in Marketing and Risk Management, and for that reason had pursued my first internship in a corporate setting this summer. Keep reading to find out more about my experience…

Life as an Intern…

So, is life as an intern in a corporate office all it’s cracked up to be? My answer in short for you is… yes! I am elated to be able to recount the incredible experience I had during my internship in Risk Management for you all. In all honesty, walking into my first day came with nerves, jitters, and moments of intimidation. However, walking out on my last day, I felt rejoiced and confident both in my newfound knowledge gained from my responsibilities and also as a business professional. I thought the best way I could convey my experience for you was by taking note of some of my favorite components of this summer!

  • Intern Events: Working as one of about 150 interns hired came with some major perks. One to keep in mind when weighing your own interest in working for a large company is the advantage of coordinated events that many organizations put on for their intern groups. Due to the magnitude of our group, I was able to attend a Chicago boat cruise, networking events, an ice cream social, and even an off-campus volunteering event! I truly looked forward to these special days, as they not only helped me to feel immersed in the company’s culture but amongst each of my intern peers who quickly became some of my great friends.
  • Mentorship Opportunities: Working around hundreds of other employees also posed the opportunity for one to pursue mentors, both formal and informal, across several, differing job functions. I’ll combine mentorship with networking, as the two were super intertwined and each intern was not only supported but encouraged to explore each area of the company and identify our own interests outside of our immediate job functions. In doing so, I was able to identify certain areas of Marketing and job roles that I would love to pursue in the future!
  • Autonomy and Freedom: One thing that I hadn’t expected of an internship prior to this summer was the true freedom I was granted in leading each project I was assigned, and achieving the goals I had set for myself during the first week of my summer. I was astonished and felt incredibly valued in the idea that even at such a large organization, my thoughts and actions were heard at such a high level; I was truly treated as a regular full-time member of our team.

Keep tuning in throughout this week and month to hear more about what I loved about my summer, what I would have changed, and what types of thoughts and ideas to look out for as you start applying to your next internship! Thanks for listening 🙂

In any job, you are most likely working with or beside other people. Work teams are common in organizations and they help functions to run effectively. Continue reading below for some tips on how to be a better team player at work!

Teamwork Makes the Dream Work

Let Others Help You: Letting your coworkers help you with tasks opens the door for more communication. It takes some of the weight off of your shoulders and makes the task at hand way easier to accomplish. Your coworkers will see you as approachable and great to collaborate with.

Listen Well: This one is important when you are on a team. You need to be an active listener when your coworkers are speaking. This will make them feel heard and valuable. And they will probably return the favor when you are speaking too.

Lead With Good Intentions: You can accomplish this by leading authentically. Your team needs to be cohesive in order to collaborate, and your intention should be to achieve that cohesion. Utilize everyone on your team and engage with them. This will help strengthen everyone’s relationships on the team.

Share Your Gifts: Bring your A-game to the team. Use your best qualities and strengths to help your team advance and get your projects done. There may be tasks that take you minutes to complete, but for someone else, it might take the whole day. Your team will appreciate you for giving it your all and saving them the hassle of spending too much time on a task.

Volunteer to Do the Dirty Work: Team members will like you if you volunteer to do the hard tasks. This doesn’t mean you need to volunteer every time when a difficult task is presented, don’t let yourself get taken advantage of. With that being said, if you’re the only person who never takes on the dirty work, your teammates might start to build up some animosity towards you. Find a healthy balance and rotation.

Spread Positivity: Be the positive light in your group when things get hard. When a group is under pressure to get something done, tensions can get really high. Take off some of the pressure by keeping things light. If someone makes a mistake, don’t dwell and judge them, acknowledge it and move on.

Observe Others Work Styles: This is an important part of being a cohesive team. You might notice that your teammate hates emailing and prefers phone calls. Or that someone would rather have meetings in the morning than afternoons. Take notice of how your teammates work best, and be flexible towards them.

These are just a few ways you can be a great team player. Collaborating with your team will help your job run smoother and make for a better work experience. Be open to feedback from teammates, don’t gossip, and don’t judge. If you give your best work and the best attitude to your team, you will become a better team player.

Read here about successful qualities a team should have!

Searching for a new position? Read through our open jobs!

Last week, we discussed things you can do over the weekend to stay productive and be successful. This week, we are going to be talking about things you should be doing early in the work week to have success. It’s important to start your week on a good note, because it sets the tone for how productive you will be throughout the week.

  1. Meditate: Meditation helps you achieve a mentally clear and emotionally calm stable state. It is an awesome way to relax before a busy week starts. It can help you arrange your thoughts and get organized in order for your week to go well. Meditation can be done by deep breathing, yoga, listening to music, etc. Any activity that is relaxing to you can be considered meditation. As long as it brings you down to a calm level, it will work.
  2. Eat Breakfast: As it’s said, breakfast is the most important meal of the day! Eat a healthy breakfast that is energizing. Try not to reach for the donut in the breakroom, but instead eat some fruit or oatmeal. Eating something that is going to fuel your day is important. It will help you focus in the morning and stay productive until lunchtime.
  3. Make a To-Do List: Make a to-do list as the week is starting. A list is a great place to have all your thoughts, tasks, and projects in one place. After you make your list, prioritize it. Prioritizing your list helps you so you can make sure you’re doing the most important tasks first and saving the other ones for later in the week.
  4. Isolate Yourself: After you’ve caught up with everyone in the office, isolating yourself to get your work done is something many successful people do. This can be as simple as shutting your office door for a few hours so no one stops by or not attending any Tuesday meetings so you can get ahead/catch up on your work for the week.
  5. Tackle the Biggest Priority: Starting with the small stuff may seem easier, but tackling the biggest priority first will be effective. You can get it out of the way by Tuesday and have the rest of the week to work on your smaller tasks. This will make for an easier, less stressful work week. This is a smart way to work and can help you feel less anxious about important projects or tasks that are on a strict time limit.

Using Monday and Tuesday to your advantage is so helpful in the long run. The course of the week goes by fast sometimes and deadlines come up sooner than you think. Use these tips to be the most successful and productive you can be at the beginning of the work week rather than an overload of work later in the week!

Searching for a new position? Read through our open jobs list!

Missed our article last week on productive weekends? Check it out here!

In order to perform the best at work, self-care should be a priority for you. When self-care is practiced, it can help your work life and personal life balance improve. If self-care isn’t one of your priorities, it may be easier for you to feel burned out or run down at work. Continue reading below for some good self-care tips!

Self-Care Tips

Say No: Learning how to say no is so beneficial for your self-care. While saying no can be difficult, it’s important to set those boundaries with your coworkers. Saying no doesn’t mean you’re a bad person, it just means you can’t handle that extra task at the moment.

Use Gaps and Breaks: Using your breaks to actually break from working is so important. As we discussed on Friday, breaks lead to better productivity. They can also help you relax and take a breather from the pile of work you have in front of you. Gaps are just as important too. If you find yourself with a few extra minutes in between meetings or tasks, use it to take a lap around the office, grab some water, or even meditate.

Add it to Your Schedule: Our schedules dictate our whole work day. Whether we have a meeting to attend or a team lunch, we always add those events to our calendar. Add in self-care to your schedule! By physically making it an event, you will be more likely to complete it. Add in ten minutes of meditation or schedule a 20-minute walk. Visually and physically blocking out time for self-care will help you practice it every day.

Update Your Workspace: Our desk and workspace should be like a sanctuary for us. Organize your workspace so you have a more clear mind. Along with organization, personalize it. Add in picture frames of family or friends and things that make you happy. Hang positive or motivating quotes, so you can feel inspired throughout your day.

These tips are great examples of how to practice self-care. Self-care is one of those things where it is just necessary in order to have productive and less stressful workdays. Take at least one of these tips and add it into your normal work routine! Self-care is practiced in different ways for everyone, so find what is right for you!

Searching for a new position? Check out our open jobs list!

Looking to relieve stress and how to do it? Find out how here!

On Monday, we discussed tips that would make for more productive meetings. Today, we are going to talk about your work day! Sometimes it’s hard to get through the day without feeling burnt out and exhausted. Creating healthy habits at work can help make your day more productive. Continue reading to find out what habits to avoid so your day can be productive!

Habits to Avoid

Sugar: Consuming too much sugar during the work day is prone to make you feel tired and unconcentrated. Overconsuming sugar will lessen your ability to stay productive throughout the work day. On the flip side, make sure you aren’t under consuming sugar. When glucose levels are down, it can also be hard to focus on the important tasks you need to complete. Keep some low sugar snacks on hand like nuts, fruits, and veggies!

Sitting all day without breaks: Don’t skip your breaks! It is imperative to your productive day that you take all of your breaks. Giving your body and brain a break will help you come back with a fresh mind that will be more productive. If you are sitting all day, it’s easy to feel foggy and tired. Get up and go for a walk on your breaks or do a quick stretch in your office. Your mind and body will benefit from it, and so will your work!

Eating a heavy lunch: After eating a heavy meal it’s common to feel very tired or like you’re in a “food coma.” Choosing a big meal while at work isn’t the best option. Your lunch will set the tone for the remainder of your work day and you want it to energize and fuel your body and mind, not make you feel lethargic.

Keeping your phone right next to you: While many people use their phone as a means of communication at work, it’s so easy to get sucked into the world of social media. Social media is a great way to procrastinate and kill time. If you’re sitting working at your desk, put your phone away and only use it on your breaks. Doing this will increase your productivity. Allow yourself 10 minutes on your phone after you finish every task, or make up a plan that suits your working conditions.

Avoiding these habits should help you have a more productive work day. Set goals, make lists, and create healthy habits to help you be your best self at work.

Searching for a new position? Check out our open jobs list!

Read our blog here to find out how to fuel your work day!

Getting through a workday is much easier if you have colleagues that like you! If you feel that all your colleagues hate or dislike you, it can make your days long and hard. You won’t feel miserable at work if people actually enjoy being around you. Understanding and using the following habits should help you gain your fellow colleague’s trust and acceptance!

Self Awareness

Self-awareness is a key factor of likable people. If you are able to recognize your strengths, weaknesses, motivations, and emotions, then you are a self-aware person. Self-awareness can help you consciously identify how people perceive you, which can be helpful in the workplace. Taking ownership of our behavior is one of the first steps of becoming more likable. Sometimes it can be hard for a person to admit their wrongdoings or faults. If you are transparent about your flaws and take accountability for your actions, you will be able to gain that approval from your colleagues.

Managing Stress

One of the reasons you may not be liked in your office could be the way you react to stress. Everyone reacts to stressful situations differently, and some people let these situations get the best of them. Pay attention to how you are treating your colleagues when you are dealing with a difficult or stressful circumstance. Are you taking it out on them or letting it affect your mood? Find new ways and outlets to manage your stress so you can maintain peace with your colleagues. If you feel a stressful task or moment is about to happen, play your favorite music or take a deep breath, and give yourself a moment to calm down. Your workplace will be happier and your coworkers will appreciate you more if you manage stress in a practical way.

Judgment

Passing judgment happens all day long. It can happen by staring at someone as they walk by or correcting someone who is speaking. These are some of the things you may do subconsciously every day. In order to be likable at work, stop judging your colleagues. Accept people for who they are- flaws and all! Beating yourself or a colleague up over a mistake isn’t productive, it just shows that you are judgmental. Everyone makes a mistake here and there, it is a part of being human. If your colleagues see you as a nonjudgmental person, they will be more open to the idea of liking you.

Try to make these things a habit and you will find that you will be more likable at work!

Searching for a new position? Check out our open jobs list!

Read here to find out about mistakes you should never make at work!

Are you worried that you are nearing the end of the road in your current job? Job insecurity is a fear that many have. There are signs that you can pay attention to in order to make sure you aren’t going to be fired! Continue reading below to find out!

Reduced Responsibilities

Is your workload much lighter than it normally is? Being assigned less work is sometimes a sign of getting fired. If you find yourself with a lot more time on your hands, pay attention to your workload or the projects that are being assigned to you. If you used to be really busy, and now find yourself with a lot of extra time, that can be a telling sign.

Coworkers Start to Distance Themselves

Do you feel like your colleagues are avoiding you? There might be a reason for that. Your coworkers might have knowledge that you are getting the ax, and in turn, they aren’t sure how to act around you. If people start whispering when you are walking by or stopping their conversation altogether, take notice, because they may be talking about you.

Performance Reviews

If you are suddenly put on a performance plan or are receiving mediocre performance reviews, this may also be a sign. Being constantly criticized at work can be exhausting and overwhelming. Sometimes performance reviews or plans mean that you are falling short of your duties, and it can be a last-ditch effort to help you improve.

New Employee

If someone is hired that has the same skill set as you or a better skill set, this can be a sign that you are getting fired. If you are asked to train this employee, that is also a red flag. Sometimes companies don’t want to fire someone unless they have a replacement, so you may be training this person to do some of your job duties and responsibilities.

While these are all signs that you are on the road to getting fired, they can also be taken out of context. Don’t panic or get paranoid right away, assess your work situation before you jump to any conclusions! Communicate with your bosses and always keep your options open!

Searching for a new position? Check out our open jobs list!

Worried about your work performance? Check out our article on behaviors to avoid at work!